Uncategorized

Don and Phyllis Neyer Outreach Center opens

After three years of planning and construction, St. Vincent de Paul officially opened its Don and Phyllis Neyer Outreach Center with a ceremonial ribbon cutting on Friday, Nov. 8, 2019.

In addition to the ceremonial ribbon cutting, the event included comments from City leaders, St. Vincent de Paul Board members and a neighbor who has been helped by the services St. Vincent de Paul offers inside the Center. The ribbon cutting was followed by an Open House that was attended by nearly 500 people.

The 36,000-square-foot facility includes an expanded food pantry and charitable pharmacy, as well as a larger homelessness prevention services area, chapel, health clinic, call center and Conferences assistance area. It also includes a new teaching kitchen to help educate neighbors on the importance of healthy nutrition, as well as an education center that provides access to computers so neighbors can learn new skills and search for jobs.

“St. Vincent de Paul operated out of our old building since 1962 and outgrew its capacity,” says Mike Dunn, executive director of St. Vincent de Paul – Cincinnati. “Our ability to serve our neighbors was hampered by the limitations of our physical space. With the opening of the Don and Phyllis Neyer Outreach Center, we can now better meet their needs by expanding access to our services, both now and in the future.”

Almost all services provided by St. Vincent de Paul are now available six days a week in the Center. In the past, the food pantry and charitable pharmacy couldn’t be open at the same time during the week because of space constraints.

“The new Center is truly for our neighbors,” says Becky Catino, co-chair of the Upward Spiral Comprehensive Campaign, which provided funding for the $7 million Center. “Our goals are to provide the most dignified experience possible for families and provide better access to our emergency services like our Charitable Pharmacy, food, clothing, furniture, as well as help with rent and utility payments. The new Don and Phyllis Neyer Outreach Center allows us to meet those goals.”

“St. Vincent de Paul is a beacon of hope for those in our community,” adds Bart Kohler, co-chair of the Upward Spiral Comprehensive Campaign and St. Vincent de Paul volunteer. “With the opening of the new Center, we can ensure more of our neighbors find the help and hope they need to move upward.”

Construction on the facility began in Fall 2018 at the northwest corner of Bank Street and Winchell Avenue in the West End, adjacent to Interstate 75. It is across the street from the Liz Carter Outreach Center, which was St. Vincent de Paul home for the last 57 years. That building is being refreshed and will remain the location of the organization’s administrative offices and the Ozanam Center for Service Learning, which provides retreats, conferences and other educational events.

In addition to the construction of the new Center, St. Vincent de Paul’s comprehensive campaign raised an additional $5 million for its Conference Assistance Fund. St. Vincent de Paul has 56 parish-based Conferences that provide a wide variety of assistance directly to neighbors in those parish neighborhoods.

“A lot of folks are surprised to learn there is great need in suburban communities as well,” says Dunn. “The Conference Assistance Fund provides a lot of help to families across Hamilton County.”

New Outreach Center Being Named After Don and Phyllis Neyer

The Society of St. Vincent de Paul is naming its new 36,000-square-foot West End outreach center after community leader and businessman Don Neyer and his late wife, Phyllis.

“We could not be more honored and thrilled that our new outreach center is being adorned with Don and Phyllis’ names,” says St. Vincent de Paul Executive Director Mike Dunn.

“Don and Phyllis have set a terrific example for all of us on how it is to love, serve and live out our faith. We will continue to honor their legacy, as we serve our neighbors in the Don and Phyllis Neyer Outreach Center.”

Completion of the Outreach Center is expected in the Fall of 2019.

The “Don and Phyllis Neyer Outreach Center” ushers in a bright future for St. Vincent de Paul – Cincinnati, allowing the organization to better fulfill its mission of serving those residents of Cincinnati and Hamilton County who are struggling and in need.

Currently SVDP operates its Lindner Choice Food Pantry, Charitable Pharmacy, many social service programs, the Ozanam Retreat Center, and Cincinnati Eye Institute Foundation Vision Clinic out of its Bank Street location.

Because of space constraints, all of those services can’t operate concurrently. The new building will allow neighbors to receive those services during one visit.

St. Vincent de Paul Breaks Ground on New Outreach Center

St. Vincent de Paul – Cincinnati broke ground this morning on its new 36,000-square-foot Outreach Center, allowing the organization to better fulfill its mission of serving those residents of Cincinnati and Hamilton County who are struggling and in need.

Bishop Joe Binzer of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati began the day by blessing the site and offering up words of prayer for the help and hope that the neighbors will receive there, while Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley spoke about how much the people of the city are blessed to be able to come to a place such as St. Vincent de Paul and receive such a wide range of assistance, from food in the Lindner Choice Food Pantry to medicine through the Charitable Pharmacy to rent and utility assistance and more.

Completion of the long-planned and much-needed Outreach Center is expected in the Fall of 2019.

Benefits of the new Outreach Center include:

  • All services will be available simultaneously. Currently, due to space limitations, the Edyth and Carl Lindner Choice Food Pantry, Charitable Pharmacy and other services that operate in the current Outreach Center can’t be open at the same time. Neighbors can then take care of all their needs in one day instead of having to come back on multiple days.
  • Neighbors will not have to wait outside the building in long lines. The current lobby and waiting area only hold a few people.
  • Individuals with physical limitations will be able to navigate our building with safety and ease.
  • Programs like the Fan and Air Conditioner Distribution, the Coat Drive and Angel Toy will be held on-site, reducing the transportation barrier many neighbors face and significantly improving organizational efficiency.

The new Outreach Center is on the site of the former Young and Bertke warehouse, known for its iconic tinman sign that faced I-75. SVDP acquired the site in 2012. SVDP has occupied the building across the street from the site since 1962. It is a former mattress warehouse that was constructed in the 1870s, and will remain the organization’s administrative offices and Ozanam Center for Service Learning.

The project is being funded through contributions to the Upward Spiral Comprehensive Campaign. To date, $9.3 million of the $12 million campaign goal has been raised. This is only the second campaign in the 149-year history of SVDP. The organization successfully completed a $2.5 million campaign in 2006, which helped fund the opening of the Charitable Pharmacy and the original renovations of the Liz Carter Outreach Center.

The Campaign also includes funds for a Conference Assistance Fund benefiting SVDP’s 56 parish-based volunteer groups across Hamilton County.

The Outreach Center was designed by GBBN and is being built by Haglage Construction.

“With the new Outreach Center, we will be able to better address the needs of our neighbors,” St. Vincent de Paul Executive Director Mike Dunn said during the Groundbreaking. “Instead of having to come down one day to visit the food pantry and another day to visit the Charitable Pharmacy, neighbors will be able to get all of those services during one visit.”

“St. Vincent de Paul – Cincinnati is a beacon of hope for those in our community,” added Bart Kohler, co-chair of the Upward Spiral Comprehensive Campaign, “and together, we can ensure more of our neighbors find the help and hope they need to move upward.”

St. Vincent de Paul announces $12 million Comprehensive Campaign; a major investment for struggling families across Hamilton County

St. Vincent de Paul – Cincinnati revealed a major investment on Wednesday, February 28 benefiting the West End and neighbors across Hamilton County.

The Upward Spiral Comprehensive Campaign will allow the Cincinnati organization to build a new outreach center in Cincinnati’s West End neighborhood and double the amount of financial support provided to parish-based St. Vincent de Paul volunteer groups throughout Hamilton County.

St. Vincent de Paul – Cincinnati will construct a new 40,000 square foot facility directly across the street from their current Liz Carter Outreach Center. The new outreach center, designed by GBBN architects, will allow St. Vincent de Paul to provide better access to services and help struggling neighbors when they need it. The facility will allow programs like the Lindner Choice Food Pantry, Charitable Pharmacy, and social services to be offered concurrently, Monday-Saturday.

“We often meet our neighbors at a crossroads where one car repair, one missed rent payment, or a medical emergency can cause a family to spiral downward into potential homelessness,” said Mike Dunn, executive director of St. Vincent de Paul – Cincinnati. “With the support of many people throughout Cincinnati, the Upward Spiral will better address the needs of our neighbors.” Construction is expected to begin in the fall of 2018 at the Northwest corner of Bank Street and Winchell Avenue in the West End.

Completion and the opening of the outreach center is expected in the fall of 2019. The existing Liz Carter Outreach Center will house administrative offices and the organization’s Ozanam Center for Service Learning. Haglage Construction will serve as the general contractor.

“The new outreach center is truly for our neighbors,” said Becky Catino, co-chair of the Upward Spiral Comprehensive Campaign. “Our goal is to provide the most dignified experience possible for families and provide better access to our emergency services like our Charitable Pharmacy, food, clothing, furniture, as well as help with rent and utility payments.”

The Comprehensive Campaign will also allow for the creation of a self-sustaining Conference Assistance Fund benefiting the 56 parish-based volunteer groups across Hamilton County.

“A lot of folks are surprised to learn there is just as much need in suburban communities as in city neighborhoods,” said Bart Kohler, co-chair of the Upward Spiral Comprehensive Campaign and St. Vincent de Paul volunteer. “The Conference Assistance Fund will provide a lot of help to Conferences and help many more families across Hamilton County.”

To date, donors have pledged $8 million to the Upward Spiral Comprehensive Campaign with a goal to raise $12 million.

“We ask people throughout our community to join the initial individuals, foundations, and companies who have already pledged their support to help us reach our final goal,” said Catino. “This campaign is reflective of the spirit of Cincinnatians. We are full of pride, we are full of respect, we treat each other with dignity, and that is a true reflection of St. Vincent de Paul.”

“St. Vincent de Paul – Cincinnati is a beacon of hope for those in our community, and together, we can ensure more of our neighbors find the help and hope they need to move upward,” said Kohler.

More information or to support the campaign, visit: SVDPcincinnati.org/upward.

St. Vincent de Paul’s Impact for Five Generations

Donor Spotlight: The Ed & Joann Hubert Family Foundation

Ed Hubert (1942-2017) was a very successful businessman who spent his entire career working alongside his family to grow the Hubert Company. He joked that he began his career sweeping floors at the age of eight and didn’t stop until the company was sold in 2000. While Ed built the business, Joann built the Hubert family; caring for their three children, and her aged mother, and still finding time to give back to the community.

The couple has always believed in sharing their time, talent and treasure and has supported many worthy causes over the years. However, their connection to St. Vincent de Paul has a deeper significance.

Around the turn of the 20th century, Ed’s grandmother emigrated to Cincinnati. She was 14, didn’t speak English and made the journey alone from Budapest. Some years later, she was married with three small children when her husband became ill. They didn’t have money for food, and St. Vincent de Paul – Cincinnati was there to help. Ed’s father remembered volunteers from St. Vincent de Paul coming to their house with bags of potatoes and onions; keeping the family from going hungry.

A generation later, Ed’s parents struggled financially; relying on government housing (they lived in English Woods) as they started their fledgling business. Joann recalls, “Ed never forgot how excited his parents were when they were finally able to get their own home. That’s part of the reason he supported St. Vincent de Paul. He wanted other people who were struggling to feel that joy.”

Last fall, the couple decided to make a transformational gift to the Upward Spiral Campaign. This pledge took on even deeper meaning after Ed’s unexpected passing in December. “I wanted this gift to honor Ed,” Joann said through tears. In early January, Joann and her three children hand-delivered their contribution. Standing together in the food pantry, they lingered for nearly an hour, alternating between laughter and tears as they shared stories about Ed and talked about what a fitting legacy this gift was. They also talked about ways to begin getting Ed and Joann’s grandchildren involved with St. Vincent de Paul.

Joann hopes their story will inspire others to support St. Vincent de Paul’s Upward Spiral Campaign also. “There are times in your life when you need a hand up. It might be money; it might be emotional support. Providing that (hand up) is just something we can do. Everyone has to find their own way of helping out.”

Ed Hubert’s grandmother found the help she needed at St. Vincent de Paul. Now, generations later, the family remains committed to supporting the organization.